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Thienel, M. ; Fritsche, A. ; Heinrichs, M.* ; Peter, A. ; Ewers, M.* ; Lehnert, H.* ; Born, J. ; Hallschmid, M.

Oxytocin's inhibitory effect on food intake is stronger in obese than normal-weight men.

Int. J. Obes. 40, 1707-1714 (2016)
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BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Animal studies and pilot experiments in men indicate that the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin limits food intake, and raise the question of its potential to improve metabolic control in obesity. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We compared the effect of central nervous oxytocin administration (24 IU) via the intranasal route on ingestive behaviour and metabolic function in 18 young obese men with the results in a group of 20 normal-weight men. In double-blind, placebo-controlled experiments, ad libitum food intake from a test buffet was examined in fasted subjects 45 min after oxytocin administration, followed by the assessment of postprandial, reward-driven snack intake. Energy expenditure was repeatedly assessed by indirect calorimetry and blood was sampled to determine concentrations of blood glucose and hormones. RESULTS: Oxytocin markedly reduced hunger-driven food intake in the fasted state in obese but not in normal-weight men, and led to a reduction in snack consumption in both groups, whereas energy expenditure remained generally unaffected. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis secretion and the postprandial rise in plasma glucose were blunted by oxytocin in both groups. CONCLUSIONS:
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Publication type Article: Journal article
Document type Scientific Article
Keywords Intranasal Oxytocin; Brain; Reward; Stress; Rats; Pathways; Nucleus; Neurons; Humans; Safety
ISSN (print) / ISBN 0307-0565
e-ISSN 1476-5497
Quellenangaben Volume: 40, Issue: 11, Pages: 1707-1714 Article Number: , Supplement: ,
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Publishing Place London
Reviewing status Peer reviewed