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Wang, X.* ; Lou, N.* ; Eberhardt, A.* ; Yang, Y.* ; Kusk, P.* ; Xu, Q.* ; Förstera, B. ; Peng, S.* ; Shi, M.* ; Ladrón-de-Guevara, A.* ; Delle, C.* ; Sigurdsson, B.* ; Xavier, A.L.R.* ; Ertürk, A. ; Libby, R.T.* ; Chen, L.* ; Thrane, A.S.* ; Nedergaard, M.*

An ocular glymphatic clearance system removes beta-amyloid from the rodent eye.

Sci. Transl. Med. 12:eaaw3210 (2020)
DOI
Open Access Green as soon as Postprint is submitted to ZB.
Despite high metabolic activity, the retina and optic nerve head lack traditional lymphatic drainage. We here identified an ocular glymphatic clearance route for fluid and wastes via the proximal optic nerve in rodents. beta-amyloid (A beta) was cleared from the retina and vitreous via a pathway dependent on glial water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and driven by the ocular-cranial pressure difference. After traversing the lamina barrier, intra-axonal A beta was cleared via the perivenous space and subsequently drained to lymphatic vessels. Light-induced pupil constriction enhanced efflux, whereas atropine or raising intracranial pressure blocked efflux. In two distinct murine models of glaucoma, A. leaked from the eye via defects in the lamina barrier instead of directional axonal efflux. The results suggest that, in rodents, the removal of fluid and metabolites from the intraocular space occurs through a glymphatic pathway that might be impaired in glaucoma.
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Publication type Article: Journal article
Document type Scientific Article
Keywords Optic-nerve Head; Ganglion-cell Degeneration; Intraocular-pressure; Mouse Model; Intracranial-pressure; Lamina-cribrosa; Disc Edema; Glaucoma; Brain; Fluid
ISSN (print) / ISBN 1946-6234
e-ISSN 1946-6242
Quellenangaben Volume: 12, Issue: 536, Pages: , Article Number: eaaw3210 Supplement: ,
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Publishing Place 1200 New York Ave, Nw, Washington, Dc 20005 Usa
Reviewing status Peer reviewed
Institute(s) Institute for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (ITERM)